Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Economic Impact Analysis on a High-Speed Railway System for Central Flo

Economic Impact Analysis on a High-Speed Railway System for Central Florida Introduction High-speed railway (HRL) systems have been used primarily over in such countries as Japan since 1964 and France since 1984. Recently the United States has generated interest in the high-speed railway as well. The proposed system would stretch from Miami through Orlando and end in the St. Petersburg/Tampa area. With bullet trains operating at top speeds of 220 miles an hour, the express travel time from downtown Miami to Orlando would take approximately 2.5 hours. Intercity travelers (trips between metropolitan regions) along with longer-distance commuters would enjoy the benefits of a system designed to connect with existing rail, air, and highway systems. The strategy behind the high-speed railway system would be to relieve highway congestion, air traffic congestion, and help reduce the necessity of expansion of highways and air systems (which is limited due to the inability to build new air space). Also, with this type of system (this system works on magnetic levitation), you would have a significant reduction in air pollution that would result as high-speed captures a large portion of the intercity travel market from automobiles and airlines.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Context Tampa  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   The chosen locations for the high-speed railway will be three different cities, Miami, Orlando, and Tampa/St.Petersburg area. The economic and industrial structures for Tampa has created more than 22,000 jobs May 2004, ranking the area #1 in Florida and among the best in the nation for job growth. Job gains in the region were largely in professional and business services. Florida is creating jobs faster than any other state in the nation, adding 171,800 jobs from May 2003 to May 2004. Tampa/Hillsborough County with its dynamic and positive business climate is one of the leading business locations in the world. As the economic hub of Hillsborough County and the Tampa Bay region, Tampa enjoys ongoing and remarkable job growth, affordable business and living costs, an able and abundant workforce, excellent educational opportunities, and unmatched weather and amenities. Service, retail, finance, insurance, and real estate sectors lead regional industry. Bioscience and other high-tech industries are expanding, thanks in part to research at university and college campuses throughout the area. Manu... ...rkforce. Reference: 1  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Keating, O. (2004). Are High Speed Trains are the best form of transport for Consumers and Society? Retrieved April 16, 2005, from http://www.o-keating.com/hsr/best.htm 2  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  City Overviews (2004). Socio-economic overview. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.carterusa.com/cityoverview/co_orlando1.html 3.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Highlights of the economic and business growth in the Tampa Bay region (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.tampabay.org/admin/editor/upload/PRN_July2004.pdf 4  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Lynch, T (2004). Florida High Speed Ground Transportation Economic Benefit and Cost Impact Study. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.floridabullettrain.com/content/economics.pdf 5  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Cox, W. (1997). Evaluation of the FDOT-FOX Miami, Orlando, Tampa High Speed Rail Proposal. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.hotpolitics.com/hispeedrail.htm 6  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Economic Development of Tampa Bay (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.tampachamber.com/economic_development.asp 7  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  High Speed Line Study (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.dft.gov.uk/stellent/groups/dft_railways/documents/page/dft_railways_032564.pdf Economic Impact Analysis on a High-Speed Railway System for Central Flo Economic Impact Analysis on a High-Speed Railway System for Central Florida Introduction High-speed railway (HRL) systems have been used primarily over in such countries as Japan since 1964 and France since 1984. Recently the United States has generated interest in the high-speed railway as well. The proposed system would stretch from Miami through Orlando and end in the St. Petersburg/Tampa area. With bullet trains operating at top speeds of 220 miles an hour, the express travel time from downtown Miami to Orlando would take approximately 2.5 hours. Intercity travelers (trips between metropolitan regions) along with longer-distance commuters would enjoy the benefits of a system designed to connect with existing rail, air, and highway systems. The strategy behind the high-speed railway system would be to relieve highway congestion, air traffic congestion, and help reduce the necessity of expansion of highways and air systems (which is limited due to the inability to build new air space). Also, with this type of system (this system works on magnetic levitation), you would have a significant reduction in air pollution that would result as high-speed captures a large portion of the intercity travel market from automobiles and airlines.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Context Tampa  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   The chosen locations for the high-speed railway will be three different cities, Miami, Orlando, and Tampa/St.Petersburg area. The economic and industrial structures for Tampa has created more than 22,000 jobs May 2004, ranking the area #1 in Florida and among the best in the nation for job growth. Job gains in the region were largely in professional and business services. Florida is creating jobs faster than any other state in the nation, adding 171,800 jobs from May 2003 to May 2004. Tampa/Hillsborough County with its dynamic and positive business climate is one of the leading business locations in the world. As the economic hub of Hillsborough County and the Tampa Bay region, Tampa enjoys ongoing and remarkable job growth, affordable business and living costs, an able and abundant workforce, excellent educational opportunities, and unmatched weather and amenities. Service, retail, finance, insurance, and real estate sectors lead regional industry. Bioscience and other high-tech industries are expanding, thanks in part to research at university and college campuses throughout the area. Manu... ...rkforce. Reference: 1  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Keating, O. (2004). Are High Speed Trains are the best form of transport for Consumers and Society? Retrieved April 16, 2005, from http://www.o-keating.com/hsr/best.htm 2  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  City Overviews (2004). Socio-economic overview. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.carterusa.com/cityoverview/co_orlando1.html 3.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Highlights of the economic and business growth in the Tampa Bay region (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.tampabay.org/admin/editor/upload/PRN_July2004.pdf 4  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Lynch, T (2004). Florida High Speed Ground Transportation Economic Benefit and Cost Impact Study. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.floridabullettrain.com/content/economics.pdf 5  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Cox, W. (1997). Evaluation of the FDOT-FOX Miami, Orlando, Tampa High Speed Rail Proposal. Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.hotpolitics.com/hispeedrail.htm 6  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Economic Development of Tampa Bay (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.tampachamber.com/economic_development.asp 7  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  High Speed Line Study (2004). Retrieved on April 16, 2005, from http://www.dft.gov.uk/stellent/groups/dft_railways/documents/page/dft_railways_032564.pdf